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editions by major contemporary artists
David Batchelor: Electric Colour Picture

David Batchelor: Electric Colour Picture

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Quick overview:

Edition of 75

Electric Colour Picture is made from a standard illuminated exit sign that has been modified to house a strange pink-purple colour that is half Rothko and half Las Vegas. The hue has been produced by the combination of two contrasting panels of transparent coloured acrylic.

SKU: db-electric-colour-picture Category: . Tag: .

About the Edition

For a number of years David Batchelor has been experimenting with colour as it is experienced in the modern urban environment: commercial, industrial colour; chemical, electrical colour; shiny, reflective, glowing colour.

Found objects such as old warehouse trollies and illuminated shop signs are used by Batchelor as supports for brilliant panels of monochrome colour. Recent works have included a number of perilously tall Electric Colour towers in which second hand steel shelving is used to support a wide variety of rectangular lighting units, from emergency exit signs to advertisements for pizza parlours.

Electric Colour Picture is made from a standard illuminated exit sign that has been modified to house a strange pink-purple colour that is half Rothko and half Las Vegas. The hue has been produced by the combination of two contrasting panels of transparent coloured acrylic.

Additional Information

Dimensions 48 x 24 x 7 cm
Edition Size

75

Materials

Emergency exit sign, fluorescent light, acrylic sheet, cable, plug

Date

2002

Batchelor’s work comprises three-dimensional structures, photographs and drawings, and mostly relate to a long term interest in colour and urbanism.

Recent exhibitions include ‘Concretos’ (New Arts Centre, Salisbury, 2014) Chromophilia: 1995-2010, Paço Imperial, Rio de Janeiro (2010); Backlights, Galeria Leme, São Paulo, (2008); Color Chart, Museum of Modern Art, New York (2008) and Tate Liverpool (2009).

In the Studio: David Batchelor was filmed for TateShots, where David Batchelor was asked about Spectrum of Brick Lane 2007, on display at Tate Liverpool. An assemblage of salvaged material transformed into a tower of colourful lightboxes, the sculpture illustrates Batchelor’s interest in city colours, rather than those of nature. In this film, he tells us how he takes inspiration from the city, the art of mastering monochromes, and why he needed to escape from ‘bloody rectangles’.

This information was last updated in 2016. For the most up to date information see
www.davidbatchelor.co.uk