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Tag Archives: wedgwood

Corinne Felgate’s works from her residency at Steelite international ceramics factory on show at Lamb Arts (1 Apr – 9 May)

As part of  “Repeat After Me”, a sculpture and installation show curated by Roya Sachs, Corinne Felgate is showing ceramic objects made while on her ‘Artist Into Industry’ residency at Steelite international ceramics factory, awarded to her in 2013. “Repeat After Me” is open to the public from 1st April to 9th May at Lamb Arts, 10 White Horse Street, Mayfair.

Corinne Felgate's Baby's Got the Wedgwood Blues on a mantelpieceBaby’s got the Wedgwood Blues, Corinne Felgate’s edition with The Multiple Store continues the artist’s fascination for the metamorphosis of the ceramics industry which started during her residency at Steelite International. She was later commissioned to create a pavilion which formed the centrepiece of the 2013 British Ceramics Biennial where the artist produced a quasi-shrine to industry and the process of production, rejection and selection.

Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues was launched in late 2014 and can be ordered on this website. Click here to read an interview with Felgate about this work and her multi-disciplinary practice.

‘Felgate’s powerful and fragile works are both an omen to the meticulous repetition of industry production processes, as well as a socio-political deconstruction of it. Slab – wedge – pub – throw ……fire are ceramic objects made on residency at Steelite international ceramics factory, in which the artist collaborated with employees at different stages of the production line. By forcing molding “mistakes” at different stages of the line, Felgate created a quasi-shrine to industry and the process of production, by re-establishing its basic principles and encouraging the viewer to rediscover it. ‘ [Lamb Arts’ Press Release for ‘Repeat After Me’]

Click here to read the full press release.

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The Multiple Store at the London Art Fair in Islington, London (21- 25 January)

The Multiple Store is pleased to be exhibiting at the London Art Fair, Business Design Centre, Islington, London N1, 20-25 January 2014. As in past years, you can find us at Stand P1 (by the main entrance to Art Projects). For more information, details of the Talks and events programme and opening hours, see the Fair website.

We have some complimentary passes to the Fair (£20 on the door), if you would like one (admits two) please contact us.

All our editions are available to purchase by interest-free instalments. Please inquire at the stand, or in advance via email: info@themultiplestore.org or by telephone on +44 (0) 7760 666518.

Highlights from the London Art Fair

Kaleidoscope-5_1Yinka Shonibare MBE

KALEIDOSCOPE, 2014. Edition: 45

Cast brass, digitally printed cotton, lacquer, mirror, lens, glass, perspex, oil

Intended by the artist as both a ‘playful piece’ as well as a serious comment on male patriarchy, within this beautifully constructed kaleidoscope Shonibare has subverted the familiar image of Botticelli’s THE BIRTH OF VENUS by replacing the female nude with a photograph of a well-endowed naked male. 

Click here to see a 4-minute video of the artist talking about the new edition to Iwona Blazwick, Director of Whitechapel Gallery.

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Corinne Felgate's Baby's Got the Wedgwood Blues on a mantelpieceCorinne Felgate

BABY’S GOT THE WEDGWOOD BLUES, 2014. Edition: 30

Flock on ceramic

This new edition draws on the heyday of Stoke-on-Trent’s iconic Wedgwood pottery, as well as its more recent demise, in an attempt to visualise a future potential for one of Britain’s last industrial heritage brands.

The flocked surface of the sculptures draws on Wedgwood’s lust for experimentation with surface colour and texture, and has been painstakingly matched to Wedgwood’s classic blues used on the Jasperware collections, which in turn endeavoured to emulate the tones and forms utilised on the roman artefacts he was so inspired by.

Click here to read our interview with the artist.

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‘Pushing materials and distorting industrial processes’ – Q&A with Artist Corinne Felgate

The Multiple Store has just launched a new edition ‘Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues’ by Corinne Felgate and the artist talks to us here about this edition, her art practice, her interest in British Industrial Heritage and her upcoming projects.

Corinne Felgate’s practice examines our relationship to luxury, power, failure, sexuality and industry through the exploration of everyday objects. Her work has been commissioned by numerous organisations including ArtsAdmin; Tate Modern, Maison de la Culture, Amiens; The National Gallery and The British Ceramics Biennial, and she has exhibited/performed with institutions including David Roberts Art Foundation (London) Oriel Sycharth (Wales), Palazzo Grassi (Italy) and Inhotim (Brazil).

Question – When The Multiple Store approached you about creating an edition, what led you to ‘Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues’?

Corinne Felgate – When Nick [Sharp, Director of The Multiple Store] and I first met, we talked a lot about the surreal-ness of the domestic collection, and the particularly British notion of creating the bookshelf or side board gallery. It occurred to me that The Multiple Store occupies this really interesting space between the commercial and the domestic, the gallery and the home. These were ideas that I really wanted to work with for the commission, and to me Wedgwood was the ultimate pioneer of collapsing the functional and the ornamental, which formed the starting point for the work to develop more organically.

Q – What do you find appealing about the concept of an edition vs. a unique artwork?

CF – As an artist who responds directly to the context or sites where the work will ultimately appear, I’m drawn to how the notion of the edition adds an extra layer of the meaning of the work. In the case of ‘Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues’, I wanted to play on Wedgwood’s re-creation of the Portland Vase (also produced in an edition size of 30) which was created after an obsessive two year period of experimentation. The vases were shown all over the world in specially created galleries at the back of ceramic showrooms and were highly covetable due to the edition size. I like how this is both paralleled and parodied through my edition and The Multiple Store. Also on a practical scale, my works tend to be large scale immersive installations these days, and I like the democracy of creating an equal number of smaller objects that can be owned by a number of collectors; it’s an artwork that then belongs to a collective of 30 people rather than just a single exclusive individual.

Q – How does this edition relate to your previous work?

CF – On a conceptual level my work looks at our cultural, & physiological relationship to making & industry in the digital age, how as individuals we have less and less to do with the fabrication of the material world and my belief that this lack of physical engagement affects, or shall we say distorts the way we understand it. Like most of Stoke-on-Trent’s heritage potteries, Wedgwood’s recent history has been tumultuous to say the least, with its future less certain than it ever has been, I really wanted to create a work that could mark this unique tipping point in time. The Wedgwood brand has always been synonymous with status and luxury, themes that many of my work explore and indeed often deconstruct. With ‘Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues’ the idea of luxury is undercut through the “shonky” finish of the objects, their imperfection draws our attention to the labour entailed in producing these familiar domestic items; they become more human because of it.

In a physical sense the edition continues my interest in pushing materials and distorting industrial processes, forcing materials like ceramic and flock together that are at once awkward and happy bedfellows. The fabrication of the edition is also very much in line with how I usually make my works, rekindling or reworking pre-industrial processes, and setting up low-fi production systems.

Continue reading…

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‘Pushing materials and distorting industrial processes’ – Q&A with Artist Corinne Felgate

The Multiple Store has just launched a new edition ‘Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues’ by Corinne Felgate and the artist talks to us here about this edition, her art practice, her interest in British Industrial Heritage and her upcoming projects.

Corinne Felgate’s practice examines our relationship to luxury, power, failure, sexuality and industry through the exploration of everyday objects. Her work has been commissioned by numerous organisations including ArtsAdmin; Tate Modern, Maison de la Culture, Amiens; The National Gallery and The British Ceramics Biennial, and she has exhibited/performed with institutions including David Roberts Art Foundation (London) Oriel Sycharth (Wales), Palazzo Grassi (Italy) and Inhotim (Brazil).

Question – When The Multiple Store approached you about creating an edition, what led you to ‘Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues’?

Corinne Felgate – When Nick [Sharp, Director of The Multiple Store] and I first met, we talked a lot about the surreal-ness of the domestic collection, and the particularly British notion of creating the bookshelf or side board gallery. It occurred to me that The Multiple Store occupies this really interesting space between the commercial and the domestic, the gallery and the home. These were ideas that I really wanted to work with for the commission, and to me Wedgwood was the ultimate pioneer of collapsing the functional and the ornamental, which formed the starting point for the work to develop more organically.

Q – What do you find appealing about the concept of an edition vs. a unique artwork?

CF – As an artist who responds directly to the context or sites where the work will ultimately appear, I’m drawn to how the notion of the edition adds an extra layer of the meaning of the work. In the case of ‘Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues’, I wanted to play on Wedgwood’s re-creation of the Portland Vase (also produced in an edition size of 30) which was created after an obsessive two year period of experimentation. The vases were shown all over the world in specially created galleries at the back of ceramic showrooms and were highly covetable due to the edition size. I like how this is both paralleled and parodied through my edition and The Multiple Store. Also on a practical scale, my works tend to be large scale immersive installations these days, and I like the democracy of creating an equal number of smaller objects that can be owned by a number of collectors; it’s an artwork that then belongs to a collective of 30 people rather than just a single exclusive individual.

Q – How does this edition relate to your previous work?

CF – On a conceptual level my work looks at our cultural, & physiological relationship to making & industry in the digital age, how as individuals we have less and less to do with the fabrication of the material world and my belief that this lack of physical engagement affects, or shall we say distorts the way we understand it. Like most of Stoke-on-Trent’s heritage potteries, Wedgwood’s recent history has been tumultuous to say the least, with its future less certain than it ever has been, I really wanted to create a work that could mark this unique tipping point in time. The Wedgwood brand has always been synonymous with status and luxury, themes that many of my work explore and indeed often deconstruct. With ‘Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues’ the idea of luxury is undercut through the “shonky” finish of the objects, their imperfection draws our attention to the labour entailed in producing these familiar domestic items; they become more human because of it.

In a physical sense the edition continues my interest in pushing materials and distorting industrial processes, forcing materials like ceramic and flock together that are at once awkward and happy bedfellows. The fabrication of the edition is also very much in line with how I usually make my works, rekindling or reworking pre-industrial processes, and setting up low-fi production systems.

Continue reading…

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Corinne Felgate in conversation at Danielle Arnaud on 26 November presenting BABY’S GOT THE WEDGWOOD BLUES

Artist Corinne Felgate will be in conversation at the Danielle Arnaud Gallery in Kennington on  Wednesday 26th November (6.00-8.30pm) during the dedicated presentation of  BABY’S GOT THE WEDGWOOD BLUES, her first edition with The Multiple Store. Please note space is strictly limited and RSVP is essential to attend to info@themultiplestore.org

Danielle Arnaud Contemporary Art is located in Kennington at 123 Kennington Road, a short walk from Lambeth Road tube station. For directions click here

da-map

For more details on this edition, you can click here and to order online click here.

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PRESS RELEASE: The Multiple Store launches BABY’S GOT THE WEDGWOOD BLUES by Corinne Felgate

New limited edition multiple by

Corinne Felgate

BABY’S GOT THE WEDGWOOD BLUES, 2014. Edition: 30

Launch price: £750

Commissioned by The Multiple Store

Following recent news that (despite the uncertain future of the brand), the world-famous Wedgwood Collection has been ‘saved for the nation’ through a national appeal that raised £15m, Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues draws on the heyday of Stoke-on-Trent’s iconic Wedgwood pottery in an attempt to visualise a future potential for one of Britain’s last industrial heritage brands.

‘’ With Wedgwood’s future less certain than ever, I wanted to create a work that could mark this unique tipping point in time.  The Wedgwood brand has always been synonymous with status and luxury, themes that many of my works explore and indeed often deconstruct. With Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues the idea of luxury is undercut through the “shonky” finish of the objects, their deliberate imperfection draws our attention to the labour entailed in producing these familiar domestic items; they become more human because of it.’

The three ceramic forms are taken from Wedgwood’s vast body of vases and urns, which were inspired by the classical roman pots being excavated from all over Europe in the mid-1700’s, most notably the Portland vase that Josiah Wedgwood saw on display in London in 1786, later producing his own version in his trademark Jasperware.

The flocked surface of the sculptures draws on Wedgwood’s lust for experimentation with surface colour and texture, and has been painstakingly matched to Wedgwood’s classic blues used on the Jasperware collections, which in turn endeavoured to emulate the tones and forms utilised on the roman artefacts he was so inspired by.

Each piece is hand-produced by the artist in her studio and finished in an industrial flocking factory, the fabrication of the edition itself miming the pottery’s evolution from craft, to industry, to art.

The edition size also echoes that of Wedgwood’s Portland vase, which was also produced in a limited edition of 30.

See our interview with the artist

Corinne Felgate

Corinne Felgate’s practice examines our relationship to luxury, power, failure, sexuality and industry through the exploration of everyday objects. More recently her research has focussed specifically on our cultural, and physiological relationship to making & industry in the digital age and has involved the rekindling or reworking of pre-industrial processes.

Baby’s got the Wedgwood Blues’ continues the artist’s fascination for the metamorphosis of the ceramics industry which started in 2013, when she was awarded the ‘Artists Into Industry’ residency for the 2013 British Ceramics Biennial at Steelite International ceramics factory in Stoke-on-Trent. She was later commissioned to create a pavilion which formed the centrepiece of the Biennial where the artist produced a quasi-shrine to industry and the process of production, rejection and selection.

Her work has been commissioned by numerous organisations including ArtsAdmin; Tate Modern, Maison de la Culture, Amiens; The National Gallery and The British Ceramics Biennial, and she has exhibited/performed with institutions including David Roberts Art Foundation (London) Oriel Sycharth (Wales), Palazzo Grassi (Italy) and Inhotim (Brazil).

PRESS INQUIRIES:

For more information, images and a detailed biography, please contact:

Nicholas Sharp
Email: nick@themultiplestore.org  or Telephone: +44 (0) 7760 666518 (mobile) or +44 (0) 20 8735 2828 (landline)

THE MULTIPLE STORE

The Multiple Store is the only UK company specialising in commissioning editions of sculptural and other works in 3D.

Founded as a not-for-profit organisation in 1998, we work with leading contemporary artists including Turner Prize nominees Fiona Banner, Anya Gallaccio, Langlands & Bell, Cornelia Parker, David Shrigley and Alison Wilding. Other commissioned artists include Keith Coventry, Peter Liversidge, and Simon Periton.

The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Yale Center for British Art; the British Council, the Arts Council of England, the British Museum and the Victoria & Albert Museum are among the many international collections that have purchased our editions.

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